Posts filed under 'Link Round-Up'

Link Round-Up for 10/18/07

I’ve been a bit busy this week so I haven’t got as many links this time around.

Careers

I did run across a few good career related links though, such as this one on Tech Republic: Write a resume that will land you a programming job. It has some very detailed tips on how to write a resume that will get you an interview.

Also, on the career front, there was this good article by Rob Walling called Q & A on Leaving Management for Development. It’s a follow-up on an earlier article he had written on this topic but it has good info all on its own. Also check out the rest of his site for more good stuff.

Architecture and Methods

I found this article, How To Tell If You’re Doing Agile Right, by Ryan Cooper. I think he does a good job of making the business case for Agile development although I’m not sure if that’s what he intended to do.

Niclas Nilsson wrote this piece on Top Ten Software Architecture Mistakes that’s pretty good. Actually he’s just condensing what Eoin Woods had said in this longer, 2 part, article, Avoiding the Icebergs.

Programming

Saptarshi Purkayastha applies a little Eastern philosophy in this article, Programming Lesson: You Are The Bug…. He’s working on some follow-up articles with the same kind of theme so check back with him later as well.

That’s all the links for this week. As always, let me know of any interesting .NET or general software development links by leaving me a comment or dropping me an email.

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Add comment October 18th, 2007

Link Round-Up for 10/10/07

Visit OpTempo.com, my other blogI found so many good links this week that my “link bucket” is overloaded so I’m going to publish this week’s Link Round-Up a day earlier than usual.

Web and .NET Development

I don’t talk about web development too often but here are some good articles I found recently that I found helpful.

If you need some ideas on the best ASP.NET practices to follow, Ode To Code has compiled this list of reference sites: Best Practice Resources For ASP.NET.

Unless you’ve been programming under a rock you know that AJAX enabling your Web 2.0 apps is that latest thing. Over at Design Vitality they’ve compiled a list of 43 Exceptionally Useful AJAX Applications.

CSS is almost a black art given the intracities of different browsers and the esoteric methods required sometimes to avoid dull old HTML tables. Design Vitality also has this helpful compilation article on how to Lose the Images: How to Get Rounded Corners, Gradients, Drop Shadows and More Using CSS.

Security is always a worry on the Internet. Sanjeev published this handy article on the Top 5 Application Security Vulnerabilities in Web.config Files. It’s packed with several good tips. Sanjeev should publish more often. He’s got some good stuff.

Mashable is offering a list of good .NET resource sites in this article: .NET TOOLBOX: 25+ Tools and Tips For Working With .NET.

Last up in this category is Joseph Guadagno. He provides us with a list of Database Drivers not provided by Microsoft.

Careers

On the career front, Jeff Atwood of Coding Horror tells the tale of writing a programming book in this article, Do Not Buy This Book. In it he describes why he prefers blogging to book writing.

In short, do not write a book. You’ll put in mountains of effort for precious little reward, tangible or intangible. In the end, all you will have to show for it is an out-of-print dead tree tombstone. The only people who will be impressed by that are the clueless and the irrelevant.

Charles Petzold responded to him in a post of his own, Hard Work, No Pay: What’s the Point?, which is also quite good, particularly considering his long career in authoring programming books.

Basically, the point is that if you want to write a book and make money, write the next Harry Potter. If you want to write a programming book, write a blog instead.

On the lighter side, over at Software Creation Mystery there is this post: Guide to Job Security for Software Developers: 15 Sure-Fire Methods. It gave me a laugh because I’ve worked with a few characters who used these job security methods.

Processes and Methods

James Golick talks about making the case for testing in this article: We don’t write tests. There just isn’t time for luxuries. If you need some good nuts-and-bolts figures to show a boss or project sponsor why testing is important, James has them for you.

Over at Developer.com Robert Bogue has this article on code reviews, Effective Code Reviews Without the Pain. Excellent work.

If you have “magic bullet” proponents in your organization, you’ll appreciate this article by Matt Stephens, Why UML won’t save your project

Pragmatic Jim had this interesting article on Agile Culture. It’s an interesting insight into this methodology.

Lastly, and also on Agile development, is the Q&A session with programming guru Steve McConnell: 5 Questions on Agile Development.

That’s all the links for this week. As always, let me know of any interesting .NET or general software development links by leaving me a comment or dropping me an email.

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2 comments October 10th, 2007

Link Round-Up for 10/05/07

I can still hear you saying You would never break the chain.I found several great links this week. Here they are:

.NET Stuff

Jonathan Aneja, a member of the VB Team at Microsoft, posted this article, Option Strict [On|Off|SortOf], that talks about how to bypass Option Strict under certain conditions, such as when doing late binding. Like Jonathan, I don’t recommend it but he shows how you can implement Option Strict ‘SortOf’.

Here’s a nice write-up on the ASP.NET page lifecycle over at the Code Project by ‘UsualDosage’. In it he coins the acronym “SILVER” to define the process.

At Chindo there is a follow-up on a previous article on StringBuilder performance called StringBuilder is not always faster - Part 2 that has some interesting benchmarks followed by some good performance tips.

Regular Expressions

I found two good articles on the basics of using Regular Expressions, Basic Regular Expressions by Adam Wolkov and Developer’s Notebook: Mastering (your fear of) regular expressions by Brian Dillard. The first is a good, basic, tutorial on how to use expressions while the second is a good directory to several RegEx online resources. (Oh, and Adam, if you read this, consider opening up your blog to comments. Use a captcha or other method to block comment spam.)

Project Management

This US Navy article, The Monkey Experiment, (or) “Why Do We Do That?” has been making the rounds. Have you ever been beaten up by your fellow code monkeys on a project for no good reason?

Peter Van Ooijen wrote this opinion piece, An architect should code. Period, over at Code Better. I’m not sure if I agree with him 100% but he does raise a good point. My main concern over his article is that this bias could easily morph into ageism which is already widespread in the IT industry.

Jobs

Speaking of ageism and sexism in the IT workplace, here’s a good InfoWorld article that takes this on: U.S. faces competitive disadvantage from lack of women in IT.

Over at Raganwald, there’s this good article on interviews: Take control of your interview. I liked his comment about politicians “staying on message.” It reminded me of an SNL skit that involved the term “Lockbox”.

That’s it for this week. As always, if you see a good .NET or general software development article I should read let me know by leaving me a comment or using the contact me button.

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4 comments October 4th, 2007

Link Round-Up for 9/27/07

Links that make you think, not stinkHere are some of the interesting links I ran across this week:

Software Development Links
Abhijit Nadgouda wrote this piece, It Is Really About You, Not The Tool, that ties in well with some of the things I’ve said in my articles. I agree with his point, “It is never about the tools, it is always about you and the solution”

Over at Java Lobby Jason posted this article, 7 Top Tips for Quality Java Software. Most of his 7 tips are also applicable to .NET development as well.

Daniel Versteegh asks an important question, Is it possible for a small company to switch their development language? While he’s not talking .NET but Java and Erlang, his comments do apply well to what we see with the VB6 vs. VB.NET problem.

Ian Suttle had me worried a minute with this article, 8 Traits for Being Mr. Right Engineer, when it seemed to set the perfection level a little too high for most humans but he clarified his position. He has good advice as long as Lumbergh isn’t your boss’ name and the “Bobs” aren’t consulting at your company.

Programming Job Interviews and Other Related Links

I’ve published a number articles on this topic recently but I’ve not been the only one.

Andrew Wulf has this interesting article called Interview Technique: A Topdown Approach. I like his idea about picking an item from a candidate’s resume and asking them to give you the details about it. I’ve tried this one a few times and it’s worked well.

Jay Fields plays a hand of interview poker in his post entitled Semi-bluffing your interview. However, he doesn’t say what to do when you get dealt aces and eights at an interview.

Steve Yegge has some good resume tips in this article: Ten Tips for a (Slightly) Less Awful Resume.

.NET Links

I’m going to wind things up with a few neat .NET articles.

Here are some neat tips for the VS IDE: 11 Visual Studio 2005 IDE Tips and Tricks to Make You a More Productive Developer. It’s centered around C# but many of the tips work in VB.NET too.

The Open Source .NET Application Generator project looks interesting. I haven’t had time yet to really examine it yet but I plan to soon.

That’s all for this week. Let me know if you read anything interesting that I should know about by leaving me a comment.

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Add comment September 27th, 2007

Link Round-Up for 9/20/07

Sometimes a link is just a linkHere are my favorite links of the week:

Aaron of AjaxNinja was kind enough to include this site in his link list this week so I’m returning the favor. I found his article, Designing a Great Data Layer in .NET, while browsing his site. If you’re designing your own data layer for a .NET project this article has a lot of good tips. His “New and Improved” data layer is very similar to one I wrote for VB.NET.

David Lowe wrote this piece, tactics, tactics, tactics, back in June. In it he compares the study of tactics in chess with the study of coding in programming. He’s got some good ideas. My only quibble would be that one does need to eventually take a more holistic approach.

Along the same lines, Alex Miller talks about Code Spelunking Techniques. While his language of choice is Java and his IDE is Eclipse, the techniques he describes will adapt well for analyzing VB.NET and C# code in Visual Studio. His methods would be quite useful for you if you needed to translate from VB to C# or vice versa.

James R. Stoup at Apple Matters has an interesting article entitled 10 Things Every Programmer Should Know For Their First Job. A lot of it is good advice for starting any new job and just not one’s first entry into the ‘real world’. I’ve used the “bowl of candy” trick a few times when I’ve come into a new job as a contractor in order to meet people.

In his article When Non-Programmers Write Software Steven Talcott Smith considers the subject of non-professional programmers writing code. He’s got some good points but I don’t idolize the amateur programmer quite as much as he does, probably because I’ve seen some real messes in classic VB and Access.

Andy Singleton has some interesting insights into off-shoring in this article: Are “offshore rates” good? What do developers get paid around the world?. Most interesting was this quote:

Even now, Indian labor is a lot cheaper if you are buying generic “resources”, which is what the Indian companies want to sell. However, the generic “resource” is not the same as a talented human. India has a high percentage of average programmers, because Indians often become programmers to get a good job, not because they are good at it. Many of those individuals would not make it in America. The percentage of truly talented programmers is about the same in any population, and it’s a small percentage.

Too bad not that many US companies have figured that one out.

That’s all for this week. Let me know if you have any .NET or general programming sites or articles I should check out by leaving me a comment or using the Contact Me button.

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2 comments September 20th, 2007

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